HSC Part Of Request To U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) For Shooting Range Projects in New Mexico

HSC expressed its willingness to work in partnership as part of a plan to develop and expand a framework of cooperation among groups at the national, regional, and local levels for planning and implementing mutually beneficial projects and activities related to hunting, fishing, and shooting sports conducted on federal lands. Specifically, comments were provided in regard to BLM’s Notice of Intent (NOI) To Amend the Taos Resource Management Plan and Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Recreational Shooting Range Project on Public Lands in Santa Fe County. One concern was that the shooting ranges under consideration for lands managed by the Field Office will result in the premature closure of surrounding public lands currently open to dispersed recreational shooting. The preliminary planning criteria identified in the NOI for the plan amendment includes several important considerations including: the closure to a public land use will be applied to the smallest area necessary to provide for public safety, sustainable resource management, and the protection of important resource values, consistent with the Dingell Act of 2019.


HSC Petitions Climate, Energy, Environment, and Science Office of Management & Budget For Migration Corridors 

Houston Safari Club aligned with several NGO’s to encourage the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to implement administration priorities to maintain, conserve, and enhance wildlife migration corridors and seasonal ranges, especially for big game species. To successfully implement these priorities, specific and sufficient funding is necessary. Historically, funding for these efforts has been redirected from existing agency budgets and programs, competing for limited agency resources. This uncertain and underfunded approach has created challenges for consistent implementation by the agencies and their partners from year to year. The request to OMB is to work with the agencies as they develop the President’s Fiscal Year 2024 budget to consolidate and target sufficient funding to address the needs of conserving wildlife migration corridors and ranges.


HSC Opposes Michigan House Bill 6192

Houston Safari Club expressed opposition in a letter to the Michigan Senate Oversight Committee in regard to HB 6192. This proposed legislation would strip the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) of its ability to make necessary and informed decisions to suspend or regulate the open seasons of fish, fur-bearing wildlife, and waterfowl species when those species are in danger of depletion or extermination. The legislation removes the Michigan DNR’s authority to suspend open seasons of certain species without an alternative plan of wildlife management being provided. 


Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting. HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols, and legislation. Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy, and legislation. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.

(Houston, TX- October 25, 2022) The Houston Safari Club Foundation (HSCF) is pleased to announce that its “Hunting Matters” radio program/podcast has been awarded a 2022 Gold MARCOM award.  

MarCom Awards is an international creative competition that recognizes outstanding achievement by marketing and communication professionals. Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, public relations firms, design shops, production companies, and freelancers. MarCom Awards is administered and judged by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals. The international organization consists of several thousand creative professionals. The Association oversees awards and recognition programs, provides judges, and sets standards for excellence.

“HSCF and the Hunting Matters production and marketing team is honored to be recognized by MARCOM. We greatly appreciate our program sponsors-Wildlife Partners, Gunwerks, FORLOH, Capital Farm Credit, MidwayUSA Foundation, U.S. LawShield, Silencer Central, Bass Pro Shops/Cabela’s, and Boyds Gunstocks,” stated Joe Betar, program co-host and Houston Safari Club Foundation’s Executive Director. 

About Hunting Matters
Tune in to “Hunting Matters” with Houston Safari Club Foundation Executive Director Joe Betar as he engages in conversations with guests, from various backgrounds, who have a passion for hunting and conservation. Great discussions, news, hunting legislation updates and more! “Hunting Matters” airs each Saturday, 6am-7am CDT on KPRC AM 950 – Real Texas, Real Talk, a Houston iHeartMedia station, and Houston’s longest running radio station. “Hunting Matters” is also available via podcast on Apple/iTunes, iHeartMedia, Google, Overcast, PodBean and Spreaker. Subscribe, listen and provide a review and rating. Hunting Matters is a 2022 Gold AVA Digital Awards and a 2022 MARCOM Gold winner!

About Houston Safari Club Foundation
Houston Safari Club Foundation (HSCF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve the sport of hunting through education, conservation, and the promotion of our hunting heritage. HSCF has awarded 638 scholarships totaling $2.77 million dollars. HSCF conducts youth outdoor education programs, career training, hunter education and field experiences throughout the year. HSCF has provided over $4 million in grants for hunter-funded wildlife, habitat, and various conservation initiatives. HSCF is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization. Visit our website at wehuntwegive.org or call 713.623.8844 for more information. HSCF. We Hunt. We Give. 

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STAG & DOVE SOCIETY SPOTLIGHT: KYLE FRITZ

How long have you been a member of HSCF?

I have been a member for nearly a year and half

Why did you become involved in SDS?

I saw an opportunity to connect with like-minded young professionals who had a passion for the outdoors and conservation that could help further my own knowledge and make a long-term impact on the rights of hunters and conservationists. 

What is your favorite part about being an HSCF and/or SDS member?

I love getting to connect with older, more experienced, members who can give insight and advice about all things, not just hunting. I believe there Is so much the older generation can teach us about conservation and life in general and are a resource for the next generation. 

What is your goal as an SDS leader?

I hope to continue to bridge the gap between the older generation of HSCF and SDS. There is a wealth of knowledge and experience that we as the younger generation need to be looking to for guidance.  

What is your career field?

Finance

Preferred hunting weapon-rifle, shotgun, or bow?

Rifle 

What is the one item you would have if you were shipwrecked on an island?

Satellite phone

What was your most challenging hunting experience?

Growing up we would hunt deer in 16-24 inches of snow. It made it extremely difficult to get to and from our spots as well as not to make too much noise.

What has been your favorite hunt trip so far and why?

I recently returned from a 7-day hunt in Patagonia Argentina for Red Stag during the rut (or the roar as they call it). It was an amazing and primal experience to hear and see these animals during their mating season and is something I will always recommend someone to do. 

Do you have a bucket list hunt you are working towards?

I’ve always dreamed of hunting Red Stag in New Zealand, specifically the South Island. Also, on my bucket list is Northern Arizona elk!

If you could have one superpower, what would it be?

Gotta be to fly!

Why should young professionals join the Stag and Dove Society?

Joining SDS will allow young professionals to expand their network with individuals who share like-minded values and initiatives while also working towards a common goal of preserving the sport of hunting through education, conservation, and the promotion of our hunting heritage.


ABOUT THE STAG & DOVE SOCIETY

Stag & Dove Society (SDS) is a leadership group made up of young professionals, between the ages of 21 and 39 years old, who are rising leaders across a range of industries. Members, through their time, talent and resources, help expand the capacity and advance the mission of HSCF. Stag & Dove Society helps cultivate the next generation of leaders and supporters of HSCF.

Stag & Dove Society is a gateway to engage talented volunteers, connect with other young professionals and other HSCF members, and raise awareness among a younger generation to ensure the longevity and support of our organization.

Learn More HERE

(Houston, TX- August 2, 2022): Houston Safari Club Foundation (HSCF) recently awarded its annual Dan L Duncan scholarships. Houston Safari Club Foundation is committed to furthering the education of students pursuing careers in the outdoors, supporting the future of tomorrow’s conservation leaders and protecting the future of hunting.

HSCF’s Dan L Duncan Scholarship Program annually awards scholarships to students involved in the study of Wildlife Management, Range Management, Biology and Wildlife and Fisheries Science. This year, twenty-one scholarships were awarded. Since the program’s inception in 1999, 646 scholarships have been awarded, totaling over $2.92 million dollars. Most of this year’s recipients were at the PhD and Graduate level of study.

HSCF proudly recognizes and encourages students, who have exhibited academic excellence and exemplary character, through its prestigious scholarship program. HSCF understands the future of conservation depends on the education of bright and gifted scholars who will work to protect hunter’s rights and wildlife conservation for decades to come. Many past HSCF scholarship recipients have become some of the top thought leaders, decision makers, educators, and research scientists in the conservation world.

About Houston Safari Club Foundation
Houston Safari Club Foundation (HSCF) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve the sport of hunting through education, conservation, and the promotion of our hunting heritage. HSCF has awarded 646 scholarships totaling $2.92 million dollars. HSCF conducts youth outdoor education programs, career training, hunter education and field experiences throughout the year. HSCF has provided over $4 million in grants for hunter-funded wildlife, habitat, and various conservation initiatives. HSCF is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization. Visit our website at wehuntwegive.org or call 713.623.8844 for more information. HSCF. We Hunt. We Give.

HSC Opposes H. R. 8262 Sec. 439: Permit Prohibition For Trophies

This bill is focused on appropriations for the Department of the Interior, environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2023, and for other purposes. HSC opposes section 439 related to Permit Prohibition which states the following: None of the funds made available by this Act may be used to issue a permit for the import of a sport-hunted trophy of an elephant or lion taken in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, or Zambia. The limitation described in this section shall not apply in the case of the administration of a tax or tariff. This division may be cited as the ‘‘Department of the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2023’’.


Cottonwood Fix

Houston Safari Club requested the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources favorably report the Bipartisan Manchin/Daines Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to S. 2561, the “Cottonwood Fix”. Since the Ninth Circuit Court issued the 2015 Cottonwood Environmental Law Center v. United States Forest Service (Cottonwood) decision, the Forest Service (USFS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) have been required to reinitiate consultation with the Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Land Management and Forest Management Plans at the programmatic level when new Endangered Species Act (ESA) information came to light. This continues to block and slow many essential USFS forest management, wildlife habitat enhancement and wildfire fuel reduction projects. On October 21, 2021, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) testified before the Committee that unless action is taken to resolve challenges stemming from the 2015 Cottonwood decision, the agency will have to go through re-consultation, regardless of the merit, on over one-hundred forest plans that “will take years and cost millions of dollars,” threatening to undermine the Administration’s 10 Year Wildfire Crisis Strategy.


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Rescinds Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat Exclusion Regulations; Significant Implications of Anticipated ESA Regulatory Revisions

The proposed rescission or revision of recent final rules creates regulatory uncertainty for all stakeholders. The Services’ rationale for pursuing rescission or revision have been summary and without effective substantive explanations. While there are various interpretations of what qualifies as or constitutes habitat for a particular species, a regulatory definition is needed for effective implementation of the ESA. The need for a consistent and workable definition of habitat is underscored by the fact that the Supreme Court ruled in a previous case that identifying habitat is a necessary precondition by which to assess whether an area can qualify for designation as critical habitat. Similarly, given the availability of judicial review of decisions not to exclude an area from critical habitat, the public and stakeholders need greater transparency and certainty regarding the critical habitat exclusion process. The planned rescissions, reversals, and regulatory changes may create confusion and obstacles for ESA implementation. Also, the Services run the risk of inviting more litigation to the process, scope, and substance of their actions. For more information: https://www.fws.gov/press-release/2022-07/service-rescinds-endangered-species-act-critical-habitat-exclusion


Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a 501(c)(4) non-profit organization dedicated to legislative and policy initiatives that may affect the future of hunting. HSC supports initiatives that protect the tradition of hunting and hunters’ rights. We take an active role in efforts to effect policy, protocols, and legislation. Our mission is to protect the rights of hunters and the hunting heritage through advocacy, policy, and legislation. Houston Safari Club (HSC) is a non-profit organization, exempt from federal income tax, under section 501(c)(4) of the United States Internal Revenue Code. Payments to HSC are not deductible as charitable contributions for federal income tax purposes. Please contact your tax advisor concerning deductibility of any payments as business deductions. HSC EIN: 76-0082197. HSC is an independent organization, is not affiliated with Safari Club International (SCI) or its affiliates and is not a chapter or affiliate of any other organization.

An Outdoor Writer Tells the Never-Before -Told Story of Returning a Vast African Wasteland to its Former Glory as One of the World’s Premier Wildlands in Bringing Back the Lions!


Come see and hear the author, Mike Arnold, September 7 at our monthly meeting! ‘Conservation Through Hunting’ 

September 7 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

MORE INFO


WATKINSVILLE, GA (July 12, 2022) — For generations, conservationists around the world have spent billions of dollars and countless hours trying to restore wildlife and wildlife habitat in areas of sub-Sahara Africa decimated by many factors, including poachers, corrupt governments, hungry local populations, and a lack of education and experience in how to balance current needs and wants with long-term, sustainable goals that benefit both wildlife and local people. And while these efforts often produce short-term results, long-term successes have been few and far between. In Bringing Back the Lions: International Hunters, Local Tribespeople, and the Miraculous Rescue of a Doomed Ecosystem in Mozambique, world-traveling outdoor writer Mike Arnold details how a small group of professional hunters and their partners turn a decimated and near-barren backcountry into one of the world’s premier African wildlands.

 

By the early 1990s, the once magnificent natural area known as Coutada 11 in Mozambique’s Zambeze Delta is poached-out and in ruins, a tragic but common situation in today’s wilderness areas. The arrival of hunting safari outfitter Mark Haldane and his many and varied partners began a decades-long, difficult – and often hilarious – journey to take the defiled and uninhabitable place and make it whole again. The result is both a modern conservation miracle and a blueprint for others to follow across Africa and around the world.

 

“With the earth’s population approaching 8 billion, working with local people to conserve wildlife is an urgent necessity, not an option, especially in Africa,” said Ludo Wurfbain, Director, Rowland Ward Foundation. “To be successful, conservation projects need to benefit local people, increase wildlife and habitat, and sustain fair-chase hunting opportunities. Bringing Back the Lions tells the story of how the restoration of the ecosystem and the social and economic advances of a local community in the Zambeze Delta have gone hand-in-hand. Mixing his personal experiences as a hunter in the region with an in-depth look at the challenges and hard work that have gone into this initiative, Arnold brings this fascinating conservation success story to life.”

 

“Professor Arnold’s work is a wonderful mix of travelogue, adventure yarn, historical novel, and environmental odyssey — an uplifting tale of ecological and social restoration,” said Ian Sherman of Oxford University Press.

 

Bringing Back the Lions: International Hunters, Local Tribespeople, and the Miraculous Rescue of a Doomed Ecosystem in Mozambique, is due out on July 12, 2022, and will be available at booksellers everywhere and at www.mikearnoldoutdoors.com or by CLICKING HERE.

 

About Mike Arnold

The Hunter’s Horn blew very early for Mike. Since the age of five he has spent months each year pursuing game animals – from quail and rabbits behind his parents’ house, to kudu and leopard in Africa, and Brocket deer in Mexico. Combined with his love of the outdoors and hunting is Mike’s passion for conservation and science which he pursues as a Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Georgia.

 

Mike has more than 150 published articles, including outdoor feature pieces in Sports Afield, Hunter’s Horn, Safari Magazine, and African Hunting Gazette. Mike also produced two TEDx presentations on the topic of conservation-through-trophy-hunting. Media outlets such as Science Magazine, The New York Times, and National Public Radio continue to contact Mike for interviews covering his research. He has published hundreds of science articles and four books on topics including conservation biology.

 

Editorial Contact:
Karen Lutto
210-451-9113 (office)                                       
[email protected]
www.hunteroc.com